There comes time when everyone wants to become someone great, someone their friends and relatives would be honored to know. I say it's time to start building that groundwork.

My name is Rebecca, and I am a writer. See the side page about my fanfiction to find a good read.

Can't find it? REQUEST IT! :D Sometimes I'm picky, but I'm always open for suggestions on what my next fic endeavor should be.
Reblogged from jessicamdawn  6 notes

jessicamdawn:

sherokutakari:

I hate spending money because like

I got new boots AND gloves AND a shirt AND a toy for my niece AND dinner stuff AND EVEN SOME EXPENSIVE CHOCOLATE for ~$60 and I’m still like

"Wow holy shit I spend so much look at that balance I’m going to live on crackers until I’m rich."

I do the same thing buying gas and a pizza. Or cat litter and $20 of groceries. Or anything really.

Reblogged from begitalarcos  125,175 notes

gallifrey-feels:

thebuttblr:

nonomella:

strawberrytop007:

hyperwolf:

livelife-havefun-partyhard:

Parrot caught singing let the bodies hit the floor

I was so done when it whispered…I would shit bricks if I heard that when I got up to get a drink in the middle of the night…

“Let the bodies hit the….FLOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOR!!!”

oh my god he’s so into it

funny as fuck

this is both metal a/f and adorable I love it

Reblogged from jessicamdawn  41,146 notes
goldenheartedrose:

flapjackstate:

[image: whovian confessions image of Amy Pond, with caption that says “a friend of mine once asked me if I could tell her anything about Amy’s life which doesn’t include the Doctor, Rory or the fact that she’s a kissogram. I could not answer”].
whatfreshhellisthis:

allonsy10:

professorspork:

myvintagelove:

ghost-of-algren:

namayo-archive:

BUT MOFFAT IS SUCH A GoOD WRITER GUISE.

I mean, how many companions can really pass this test?
Name one thing about Rose’s that doesn’t involve the Doctor, her mom, her dad, Mickey, or her job when she met the Doctor. I’m drawing a blank.

When she was sixteen she dropped school and moved out because she was in love with Jimmy Stone, which resulted in her never getting her A-levels. He later broke her heart and she returned to live with Jackie.
Is that enough?
RTD may have his flaws when it comes to writing (nobody’s perfect anyway) but at least he made the effort to give us glimpses of the life the companions had before meeting the Doctor. Moffat doesn’t care because that’s obviously not that important.

Rose got the bronze in an under-sevens gymnastics tournament; Rose’s best mate was named Shareen, and they used to skip school sometimes to go to the shops and look at boys; Rose loves chips and likes pizza and tolerates football; Rose has never learned French, though Jackie thinks she should’ve.
These are all things we learn within the first six episode of series one. And that’s not counting the remarkable depth and breadth provided when one fully incorporates her parents, which were restricted despite not being on Amy’s list. And you can say BUT THAT’S NOT FAIR, AMY DIDN’T HAVE PARENTS, but lol now she does and they’ve never explored how that changed her, and LOL PETE’S DEATH HAD A MASSIVE, VISCERAL EFFECT ON ROSE AND THE PLOT OF THE SHOW AND WAS MENTIONED SEVERAL TIMES BEFORE IT WAS EXPLORED AND IT’S A PART OF HER.
Rose’s life on the Powell Estate is more vividly rendered and thoroughly examined in just the Aliens of London/World War 3 two-parter than Leadworth has been in the two seasons we’ve known the Ponds. It’s not just Rose we learn about; we learn about her family in her absence, we see Mickey and Jackie interact and learn and grow together, painting a picture of their past and building a future, because they have a relationship COMPLETELY INDEPENDENT OF ROSE. We learn that Rose is the kind of person who knows exactly where things are in her boyfriend’s kitchen, even when he doesn’t, even when she hasn’t stepped foot in his flat in a (technical temporal) year. We get cut aways to the British *and American* newscasts of plot events, for chrissake. 
I mean, I’d make similar lists for Martha and Donna, or heck, even for any of the one-off guest companions from SINGLE EPISODES in Rusty’s era who’ve had more thoroughly-painted backstories than Amy Pond, but I’d give myself carpal tunnel and sacrifice several hours typing it all out.
The two showrunners are incomparable.

I was about to say the whole bronze under sevens thing but professor spork did a much better job. None of Moffat’s companions even compare. He just doesn’t flesh them out at all.

EXACTLY
I think I’m going to ask this post to marry me I love it so much

I’m not even a Doctor Who fan and I love this analysis.

Reblogging this again. I like Amy as a character, for the potential of what she could be. But Moffat…well, he doesn’t make it easy to love her because though she is a strong, somewhat likable character, she is quite one dimensional. Her character revolves around Rory and the Doctor. I can’t name one thing she does exclusively for her. Unlike Martha, Rose, and Donna.

goldenheartedrose:

flapjackstate:

[image: whovian confessions image of Amy Pond, with caption that says “a friend of mine once asked me if I could tell her anything about Amy’s life which doesn’t include the Doctor, Rory or the fact that she’s a kissogram. I could not answer”].

whatfreshhellisthis:

allonsy10:

professorspork:

myvintagelove:

ghost-of-algren:

namayo-archive:

BUT MOFFAT IS SUCH A GoOD WRITER GUISE.

I mean, how many companions can really pass this test?

Name one thing about Rose’s that doesn’t involve the Doctor, her mom, her dad, Mickey, or her job when she met the Doctor. I’m drawing a blank.

When she was sixteen she dropped school and moved out because she was in love with Jimmy Stone, which resulted in her never getting her A-levels. He later broke her heart and she returned to live with Jackie.

Is that enough?

RTD may have his flaws when it comes to writing (nobody’s perfect anyway) but at least he made the effort to give us glimpses of the life the companions had before meeting the Doctor. Moffat doesn’t care because that’s obviously not that important.

Rose got the bronze in an under-sevens gymnastics tournament; Rose’s best mate was named Shareen, and they used to skip school sometimes to go to the shops and look at boys; Rose loves chips and likes pizza and tolerates football; Rose has never learned French, though Jackie thinks she should’ve.

These are all things we learn within the first six episode of series one. And that’s not counting the remarkable depth and breadth provided when one fully incorporates her parents, which were restricted despite not being on Amy’s list. And you can say BUT THAT’S NOT FAIR, AMY DIDN’T HAVE PARENTS, but lol now she does and they’ve never explored how that changed her, and LOL PETE’S DEATH HAD A MASSIVE, VISCERAL EFFECT ON ROSE AND THE PLOT OF THE SHOW AND WAS MENTIONED SEVERAL TIMES BEFORE IT WAS EXPLORED AND IT’S A PART OF HER.

Rose’s life on the Powell Estate is more vividly rendered and thoroughly examined in just the Aliens of London/World War 3 two-parter than Leadworth has been in the two seasons we’ve known the Ponds. It’s not just Rose we learn about; we learn about her family in her absence, we see Mickey and Jackie interact and learn and grow together, painting a picture of their past and building a future, because they have a relationship COMPLETELY INDEPENDENT OF ROSE. We learn that Rose is the kind of person who knows exactly where things are in her boyfriend’s kitchen, even when he doesn’t, even when she hasn’t stepped foot in his flat in a (technical temporal) year. We get cut aways to the British *and American* newscasts of plot events, for chrissake. 

I mean, I’d make similar lists for Martha and Donna, or heck, even for any of the one-off guest companions from SINGLE EPISODES in Rusty’s era who’ve had more thoroughly-painted backstories than Amy Pond, but I’d give myself carpal tunnel and sacrifice several hours typing it all out.

The two showrunners are incomparable.

I was about to say the whole bronze under sevens thing but professor spork did a much better job. None of Moffat’s companions even compare. He just doesn’t flesh them out at all.

EXACTLY

I think I’m going to ask this post to marry me I love it so much

I’m not even a Doctor Who fan and I love this analysis.

Reblogging this again. I like Amy as a character, for the potential of what she could be. But Moffat…well, he doesn’t make it easy to love her because though she is a strong, somewhat likable character, she is quite one dimensional. Her character revolves around Rory and the Doctor. I can’t name one thing she does exclusively for her. Unlike Martha, Rose, and Donna.

Reblogged from writewild  647 notes

Writing Advice: Make Your Description Interesting

writewild:

by Christian Seehausen

Three Golden Rules for Description

1. Balance

Each scene should include details, and not just details of sight, either. Not every scene needs to include multiple senses- sight, touch, smell- but it’s imperative to use them all within the story as a whole. But don’t overwhelm the scene with details, either. Drop them in where it’s relevant, but don’t let them take over your writing.

2. The relevance of details

A detail’s relevance is determined by the perceptions of the point-of-view character. See what he sees, smell what he smells, and put that in your story. His emotions should affect what you choose to describe, as well, and how you choose to describe it. The deeper you get into the point-of-view of your character, the more interesting and relevant your description will be.

3. Be cautious with figurative language

Don’t overuse figurative language. Be very cautious about each metaphor and simile you include in your description. Is it a cliche, or just too obvious and trite? Does it actually seem fitting? Are you mixing metaphors? When in doubt, write plainly. It’s better to be plain than to call attention to yourself, as the author, with a flamboyant failure. Remember that you want the reader to be absorbed in the story, not marveling at how clever of a writer you are.

Don’t stress too much over description, though. There’s a big, happy medium between including too little of it and overdoing it, and you shouldn’t find it hard to get comfortable there. Just keep the above rules in mind and you’ll do fine.”

Guide: How to Make Simple Writing More Vivid

writing-questions-answered:

ohpossibilities asked: Hi, my writing seems to be too simple sometimes. I try to make it look and sound professional, but it seems it’s not enough. Any tips?

There are many aspects of writing that set great writers apart from those who need more practice. One of the biggest is the way in which words are used—whether they are just words describing something, or whether they render that something in detail so vivid that it plays like a movie in the reader’s mind.

"The girl woke up in the morning. She got dressed. She didn’t want to go to school, but she went anyway."

These words do tell a story, but it’s a boring story, because the description is so basic.

"Her eyes opened and immediately squinted against the bright amber light that came through her window. Coffee and fried bacon hung heavy in the air, so she forced herself out of bed and pulled on fresh clothing. The bus would be there before long, and though she’d sooner swim in lava than spend another day at Greenstone High, there were a shocking lack of volcanoes in Connecticut." *

* semi-auto-biographical. ;)

So—definitely a slight improvement simply because the scene is more vivid. We can imagine this girl squinting in the morning light, and we can almost smell the bacon and coffee in the air. Most of us can probably commiserate with the feeling of wanting to do anything else besides go to school. So this gives us something to grab onto, whereas the other attempt leaves us cold.

There is a really wonderful book by Rebecca McClanahan called Word Painting, which I highly recommend to anyone wanting to make their writing sound more professional. 

Here’s some of my favorite advice from the book. Examples are my own:

1) Use description to make the world of your book more real to the reader than the space they are currently inhabiting.

2) Try not to describe things by labeling them. Instead, describe the attributes that lead you to the label. Instead of saying, “She was petting Max the cat.” You could say, “She put her hand in Max’s soft fur and felt the rhythm of his purring.”

3) Describe a subject or object in motion, even if it isn’t in motion. A child who is running could have bouncing curls. A man who is sitting can be reading or smoking. Snow on the ground can be melting or glittering.

4) Be sure to use the right, most appropriate word for an object. Don’t call a coffee mug a “glass.” Don’t describe your female mercenary as having “porcelain” skin, because “porcelain” implies fragility. You could just say she’s “fair-skinned” or that “her skin was as pale as white marble.” 

5) Sometimes, describing what isn’t there is more interesting than describing what is there. For example: You could say, “The rest stop was silent and the highway was abandoned.” But it sounds a little more interesting to say, “There was no sound coming from the highway now. No thundering semi-trucks, no rumbling motorcycles—not so much as an errant screech or piercing car horn.”

6) Use active instead of passive prose. Passive: “The fence is being painted by the girls.”  Active: “The girls are painting the fence.” Here is a great explanation of active versus passive voice.

7) Don’t use filtering devices if you can help it. Words like “felt,” “saw,” “observed,” “noticed,” etc, take the focus away from what’s happening. “Her stomach clenched when the man drew his gun,” is much more effective than, “She felt her stomach clench when she saw the man draw his gun.”

8) Avoid unnecessary suffixes, like -ful, -ment, -tion, -ance. For example, “Her tearful face was a demonstration of the candidness of her demeanor,” is really clunky. “Her tears demonstrated her candor,” sounds a lot better and is much more to the point.

There is sooooooo much more in the book. That is really just the tip of the iceberg. So, if you can get it, do! Be sure you have sticky notes, a notepad, or a highlighter so you can mark the great information as you come to it.

Go through your writing and see what you can change, then keep all of these tips in mind as you write in the future. Write as much as you can, because your writing will get better with practice. 

ETA: Also, check out this fantastic post by Christian Seehausen at Write Wild, which details three golden rules for description.

Cats are Dogs are Cats

I don’t know why people think cats and dogs are so different. Both wag their tails. Both growl. Both can even bark. Both have varying reactions to you entering the house - from ‘omg you’re home, pet me and love me and never leave ever again’ to ‘oh. you’re home. shame.’ The same goes for when you leave the house.

Cats and dogs both get excited when it’s food time. Both will sit by you and beg for food if not trained off that behavior (and sometimes regardless of training). Both like to cuddle and get on your lap and on your computer and in your face and step on you and curl up next to you and interrupt your reading/video games/whatever.

Both get fleas and are treated with the same type of treatment (pretty sure the main difference in flea products is they expect dogs to be larger and thus there’s too much concentration of product in the dog medicine to allow safe usage on a much smaller animal).

Some like baths and some do not. Some like car rides and some do not. Some get along with other pets and some do not (even their own species). Both eat meat but will at least smell and probably lick anything you offer them. Both clean themselves with their tongues (if you doubt this with dogs, watch one clean between its toes once and get back to me).

Both love laser pointers and laying on soft pillows/blankets/etc, but are not averse to laying on remotes/phones/shoes/etc. Both like to chew on things unless trained otherwise. Both can be taken on walks.

Like, choosing a side of cats or dogs is ridiculous. They’re extremely similar creatures, except one of them doesn’t have to rely on you to let it properly go poop.

my tagging system is very basic and does not include trigger warnings for a very simple reason.

I am way too busy to tag every potentially triggering thing in everything I post.

It would end up being like Trigger Warning: flashing lights, epilepsy, strobes, bright colors, big dogs, seclusion, dark colors, ghosts, rape, sexual assault, abuse, big cats, spiders, monsters, lightning, rude language, insults, sexism, ableism, racism, other isms, kissing, slash, hetero, boxes, small spaces, open spaces, forests, water, ocean, heights, brick walls, loud noises, feet, magic, death, teeth, food, pork, meat, sweets, cake, cooking, balls, knives, ice, pasta,

like… do you know how much extra time I would spend sitting there, thinking about every possible way to tag something so no one ever ever ever gets upset or bothered or triggered? Literally anything can be a trigger, and while I do use some of the tags I mentioned in the example list, I don’t have time to tag everything.

So please forgive, but I will undoubtedly never start tagging everything. This isn’t me being malicious or hurtful. It’s me having a life outside of tumblr - something I do for fun - and not having time to devote to hardcore tagging.

Reblogged from unproductivepeanut  4 notes

unproductivepeanut:

So…I have some pretty awesome friends. I do. And over the past month four separate friends have made the three (or four) hour drive to come hang out.

It’s awesome.

And yet I feel worse after they leave because I’m still here. I love my job, I do, and my apartment is nice (enough) but seeing my friends just reminds me that I’m here alone (save for my cats).

They keep joking, asking when I’m moving back…and I can’t. There wasn’t a job for me there, and regardless my contract here is until March. And I do love my job, truly.

It’s just lonely, here. The department where I teach is small, and I’m the youngest teacher there. I’ve made a couple friends, but they’re either married or have kids, so we’re in slightly different parts of life. 

This complaining makes me feel awful, too, because I know that I’m lucky: I have a great job and my cats and can get by on my own.

But sometimes it really sucks being in a new(ish) city without contacts.

Why does life have to be so hard?

But at least you have plenty of people who love you <3

Reblogged from jessicamdawn  355,210 notes
sarahseemssilly:

theycallmethemoose:

everkings:

gildatheplant:

pragtastic:

fifty-shades-of-gandalf-the-grey:

leomoriat:

poesdaughter:

Or, y’know, that thing called “Passover.”

Or the whole thing with Noah’s Ark where he killed off everything in the world except Noah and his family, and two of every animal. Y’know, no big deal. Just millions of people.

90% of the Old Testament is about God killing people in temper tantrums

Are we not going to mention Jesus?

Nailed it.

*wheeze* 

Oh my god.

Nailed it.

sarahseemssilly:

theycallmethemoose:

everkings:

gildatheplant:

pragtastic:

fifty-shades-of-gandalf-the-grey:

leomoriat:

poesdaughter:

Or, y’know, that thing called “Passover.”

Or the whole thing with Noah’s Ark where he killed off everything in the world except Noah and his family, and two of every animal. Y’know, no big deal. Just millions of people.

90% of the Old Testament is about God killing people in temper tantrums

Are we not going to mention Jesus?

Nailed it.

*wheeze* 

Oh my god.

Nailed it.